Glowing Grass – The First Pleasing Result

If you haven’t read my previous posts, I’m currently in an all-consuming process of drawing birch trees.

I just haven’t realized how wonderful they actually look, and how they stand out in any forest scenery.

So I’ve been drawing them up with an added wash of watercolor, which I’ve found very enjoyable.

The first piece ended up like this:

Then came the second:

In both cases I liked some of the features, but were equivalently displeased with others.

You can read more about that in my previous posts, if you’re feeling curious.

Now, however, it was time for my third attempt, which gave me a pleasing result:

Don’t get me wrong, there are still much to work on.

The paint ended up too smudgy in some places.

And the color blends didn’t mix as harmoniously as I wanted.

But at least I am satisfied with how the drawing ended up, and how strong the colors look.

I also like that combination of blue and yellow, which came together through a very spontaneous choice.

So, all in all, I don’t feel done with this birch tree collection at all.

If anything, this piece gave some steady streams of water for my mill.

I hope you’ll tag along.

And I hope that you’re doing alright, and that you’re having a good day!

6 thoughts on “Glowing Grass – The First Pleasing Result

  1. I like the combination of the line and loose washes and the colours glow nicely. I like the composition of the third but prefer the looser quality of line and shapes of the first drawing, which appears to me the most relaxed study. A very good choice of focus for drawings, birches and aspens are beautiful trees. I love the sharp contrast of birch stems against darker forest and the fluttering gold leaves in the autumn. In winter, I’ve walked through birch woods that had a subtle deep red glow from the dark red-wine colour of the young twigs and branches. Good work, keep going!

    1. Thank you so much for your insights on this. I really appreciate it! 🙂 I’ve tried my best to keep the drawings loose, but I always end up drawing tighter for each new drawing or painting in a series. So I bet you’re spot on about the first drawing being the most relaxed and loose one. That’s when I don’t know exactly what to draw yet, before I find a look I want to maintain and therefore involuntary tighten up.

      And you’ve just summed up perfectly why birch trees are my main focus in this series. I’m surprised I haven’t really seen the beauty in them before.

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