Where To Go – Something Simple

I found the title “where to go” suiting for this drawing.

Much like life, I guess.

You start out at the point you’ve been placed.

Then you start walking.

You don’t have much.

But there will be lots to pick up along the way.

28 thoughts on “Where To Go – Something Simple

    1. They are! I didn’t dare drawing people before. Or any other living creature, for that matter. It just seemed to hard to get it right. Now that I’ve realized that they can be just the way I want them, it’s so much fun! 🙂

  1. I agree with Ronnie. And, this is almost too “simple” from you. It’s stark and naked of color and wonder, yet those two figures seem to be talking. What are they discussing? I’d like to turn this into some sort of comic strip panel. But, I am at a loss for what to insert (dialogue). But…this needs something. It needs a story to follow this opening scene image. The movie begins here. What is the story? Two mobsters discussing where to bury a secret package (body) before parting ways to elude authorities? A quest for a hidden treasure mentioned in an ancient letter?

    1. There is certainly an open story to be made here. I kind of like the idea that, like you’ve done here, each person who sees it can make up the story. I really enjoy hearing the different interpretations, which also gives me lots of motivation to keep on making more 🙂 A quest for a hidden treasure seems nice, though. When looking at it now there is a LOTR-vibe about the landscape, at least in my mind 🙂

      1. I once, long ago, as a kid, tried to host something like this in an elementary classroom. I gave my class an idea to draw and then asked them to expand upon the idea. They could have done any number of things to impress me with their creativity. But, I guess, it was an early lesson of what I’d face ahead. Creativity was very low, as was effort given. I fail too often, trying to get a group of people to be inspired and try something my supposedly amazingly smart and creative brain (so I am told) concocts. So, what good is all of my creative thinking, anyway?

        See? You, too, need(ed) inspiration. Yes, this is the best interaction with art an artist can get.

        Yea, but LOTR was not as barren as your picture. 😛 Even the harsh snowy or rocky scenes had more to offer. Your scene is stark but like a small window into a story yet to unfold. It’s an intimate moment in time, captured for consideration. If you want it to be more LOTR, add some lower rock formations, flush out the trees (make them more lively) and maybe throw in a hazy watercolor sky or some little forest creatures scurrying about the place.

      2. Well that sounds like a bummer. I also often overdo my efforts when it comes to activities with others. For me I put too much energy in the details, and it ends up being too much for people to catch interest in. But I think your idea would work quite well with an adult class, having an interest in exploring their creativity.

        I see what you mean about the LOTR-vibe, by the way. This is more of a Norwegian scene, I guess, which is quite a bit less lush than the nature in LOTR. Especially the New Zealand landscape where the movies are shot. So it’s probably not Frodo and Sam standing there. Maybe Frode and Stian (Norwegian names ;))

      3. Right. We’re…too much for some people. Just as people on Jeopardy can be too “smart” for me and get on my last nerve. [Technically, they’re robotic know-it-alls who behave strangely.] Perhaps that is just the nature of one’s passion; it shines too bright for others to tolerate. Maybe, when we get blinded by the sun, it is the sun being passionate about whatever is at its core.

        I’ve had many ideas for my own sort of art therapy class, but I looked into becoming certified and didn’t care for the need to become a licensed psychologist first.

        Your piece could be Roman, too, considering similar trees were spaced in a similar way, once upon a time, to accommodate equestrian soldiers yet retain some cover from projectiles. But, I am not so familiar with the Italian mountain ranges. I’ve only been to a few volcanoes during late summer.

        Maybe Frohg and Tode. [My weak attempt to make Frog and Toad sound more cultural. :P]

      4. I think you’re right there. Getting to passionate craves the same level of passion for other people to get involved, and people rarely share quite the same passions.

        Haha. Frohg and Tode it is 😉

      5. I never forget the Frohg and Tode tale about the box of cookies, because I had to make a small school play/skit for class as a kid. I made paper-bag masks for Frohg and Tode, which were not very impressive and rather noisy during the skit. I had a very hot spotlight and two “actors” who were not the easiest to direct (nor did they remember their lines, well). It was a challenging moment…a moment I tie up with a string and put on a shelf so I am not tempted to binge on cookies (to ease my mind).

      6. Sounds like quite the challenge for a young director 🙂 I remember how serious we took those plays, thinking that the parents who came to watch were hard critics. Like we had to deliver our best performance to be worthy their time 🙂

      7. There were no parents at this one. It was a class project. Groups of students had to compose a small play from a book they read. The only play I did for parents was the 8th grade play.

      8. It was only difficult because I had to work with two other boys who didn’t often…well, see things my way, which sounds like I’m a snob. We just didn’t agree, and I felt like I had to make all the effort. If I left the project to either of the other boys, I feared it wouldn’t be completed. Or, at the very least, I’d be less proud of the result. I didn’t trust them enough. And, they didn’t show me enough ambition to do a better job. If one of them had been bold enough to say, “I’ve got this. You just do ___;” I might have felt more reassured.

      9. I can really relate to that 🙂 Taking that whole responsibility on your own is hard to manage over time, though. I’ve found that I’ve been holding others back as a result of it as well.

      10. I dunno. I just seem difficult to approach and work with, though I like to think I’m cooperative and more patient than the average person. And, if I ever feel I am holding someone back or obstructing something good, I’ll be inclined to self-destruct.

      11. Sounds like you are aware of that danger, then, and able to avoid it 🙂 I’ve never been able to socially connect with people as easy as it seems to be for a lot of those around me, I guess it’s a skill that’s a bit subpar, like we all have in different areas 🙂

      12. Is it a skill or a natural ability, like luck? I think some people are just naturally bathed in a social aura while others carry targets or warning signs on their backs and/or fronts.

      13. That may be. There sure are a bunch of different mechanisms which affects our behavior. A lot of them does not seem to be deliberate or conscious.

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